Untitled

http://acquaintedwithrask.tumblr.com/post/93084504359/pinkplasticpen-thedarklordsnicklefritz-so-i

pinkplasticpen:

thedarklordsnicklefritz:

So i have a cousin who is really big into this whole “Paleo” diet, and her facebook and pinterest are loaded with posts related to it.

Today she posts “If it wasn’t a food 100 years ago, it’s a man-made product.”

You know that basically all…

I’m pretty weary of all “diets”, they tend to have weird rules for what you can or can’t eat that aren’t based on actual science, plus they usually profit off commoditizing women’s bodies and all of the damaging effects that come with it.

The only real way to “diet” that I see is to research the food you eat (with real science, not pinterest) and decide what will best suit your needs based on things like energy density, essential and nonessential vitamins and nutrients, protien compliments, calorie consumption, body/metabolism type (endmorph, ectomorph or mesomorph), etc.

But if its not already obvious, I pretty much eat what I want (and what won’t give me lots of anxiety), without much regard to what’s “healthy” or will help me lose weight. So I’m pretty supportive of people choosing to eat whatever makes them happy. As long as they don’t try to pass psuedo-science for the real thing.

http://pinkplasticpen.tumblr.com/post/93083843757/thedarklordsnicklefritz-so-i-have-a-cousin-who

thedarklordsnicklefritz:

So i have a cousin who is really big into this whole “Paleo” diet, and her facebook and pinterest are loaded with posts related to it.

Today she posts “If it wasn’t a food 100 years ago, it’s a man-made product.”

You know that basically all the plants we eat have…

Yeah. I usually ignore when people in my family do fad diets, but when they try to defend their diet by claiming that its scientific when it isn’t and its clear that they haven’t done any sort of research into the science part of it, I cringe pretty hard. (It doesn’t help that I had to take my college nutrition class 3 times where we really got into the chemistry side of things and was painfully aware of how many calories were in one gram of protien etc. Plus, my brother is a bodybuilder and is always asking me to help him figure out nutrition stuff)

thenorsebros:

if i die before my favorite show ends then use an ouija board to keep me updated about what happens next

(via blackbird96)

acquaintedwithrask:

eskapismus:

nigerianheir:

couple pictures I found of life in 1956 in the South

most of these are from my hometown and it hurts so bad to see it. but we need to see it.

this was a Real Thing like it seems so far away and surreal sometimes in photographs but no this is how it literally was and not too long ago.  Like imagine walking down the street and there’s segregated drinking fountains like that.  And it was totally normal.

pinkplasticpen:

omgthatdress:

Evening Jacket
Charles Fredrick Worth, 1890
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

O.O
omgthatdress is on point today, goddamn

pinkplasticpen:

omgthatdress:

Evening Jacket

Charles Fredrick Worth, 1890

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

O.O

omgthatdress is on point today, goddamn

tumblingtheology:

bookishboi:

lastrealindians:

Teen scientist harnesses sun power to help Navajo community
New Mexico teen Raquel Redshirt uses everyday materials and the sun to build solar ovens, fulfilling a Navajo community need and winning an award at the Intel ISEF competition.
Growing up on New Mexico’s Navajo Nation, Raquel Redshirt was well aware of the needs of her community. Many of her impoverished neighbors lacked basics such as electricity, as well as stoves and ovens to cook food.
Though resources in the high desert are limited, Raquel realized one was inexhaustible: the sun. “That’s where I got the idea of building a solar oven,” the teen says.
She researched solar ovens and found that most incorporate mirrors or other expensive materials. Raquel wanted to create a design that anyone could easily afford and replicate, using readily available materials.
READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/06/19/teen-scientist-harnesses-sun-power-to-help-navajo-community/

Yes!!

GO NEW MEXICO! GO NAVAJO NATION! GO BRILLIANT TEENAGE GIRLS!

tumblingtheology:

bookishboi:

lastrealindians:

Teen scientist harnesses sun power to help Navajo community

New Mexico teen Raquel Redshirt uses everyday materials and the sun to build solar ovens, fulfilling a Navajo community need and winning an award at the Intel ISEF competition.

Growing up on New Mexico’s Navajo Nation, Raquel Redshirt was well aware of the needs of her community. Many of her impoverished neighbors lacked basics such as electricity, as well as stoves and ovens to cook food.

Though resources in the high desert are limited, Raquel realized one was inexhaustible: the sun. “That’s where I got the idea of building a solar oven,” the teen says.

She researched solar ovens and found that most incorporate mirrors or other expensive materials. Raquel wanted to create a design that anyone could easily afford and replicate, using readily available materials.

READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/06/19/teen-scientist-harnesses-sun-power-to-help-navajo-community/

Yes!!

GO NEW MEXICO! GO NAVAJO NATION! GO BRILLIANT TEENAGE GIRLS!

(via ecumenicalseeker)

fandomsandfeminism:

xxtopamaxx:

Wtf?! How the hell does that work?! Dumb bitch

Did you consider googleing this to see what she was referring to? Because I wasn’t sure either, but sure enough, a quick google search found: 
Clime Change will affect women more severly than men

The report, Gender and Climate Change(available here as a PDF), concludes that women are more severely affected by climate change and natural disasters because of their social roles and because of discrimination and poverty. To make matters worse, they’re also underrepresented in decision-making about climate change, greenhouse gas emissions, and, most critically, discussions and decisions about adaptation and mitigation. From the report:

For example, the 20,000 people who died in France during the extreme heat wave in Europe in 2003 included significantly more elderly women than men. In natural disasters that have occurred in recent years, both in developing and in developed countries, it is primarily the poor who have suffered—and all over the world, the majority of the poor are women, who at all levels earn less than men. In developing countries, women living in poverty bear a disproportionate burden of climate change consequences. Because of women’s marginalized status and dependence on local natural resources, their domestic burdens are increased, including additional work to fetch water, or to collect fuel and fodder. In some areas, climate change generates resource shortages and unreliable job markets, which lead to increased male-out migration and more women left behind with additional agricultural and households duties. Poor women’s lack of access to and control over natural resources, technologies and credit mean that they have fewer resources to cope with seasonal and episodic weather and natural disasters. Consequently traditional roles are reinforced, girls’ education suffers, and women’s ability to diversify their livelihoods (and therefore their capacity to access income-generating jobs) is diminished.

The report notes examples from other sources, including this:

An Oxfam Report (March 2005) on the impact of the 2004 Asia Tsunami on women raised alarms about gender imbalances since the majority of those killed and among those least able to recover were women. In Aceh, for example, more than 75 percent of those who died were women, resulting in a male-female ratio of 3:1 among the survivors. As so many mothers died, there have been major consequences with respect to infant mortality, early marriage of girls, neglect of girls’ education, sexual assault, trafficking in women and prostitution. These woes, however, are largely neglected in the media coverage.

And this:

In a study executed on behalf of ACTIONAID in 1993-1994 in the Himalayan region of Nepal, it became clear that environmental degradation has compounded stress within households and pressure on scarce resources. This meant that the pressure on children, particularly girl children, to do more work and at an earlier age was increasing. Girls do the hardiest work, have the least say and the fewest education options. Programmes that concentrate only on sending more girls to school were failing as the environmental and social conditions of the families deteriorated.


Amazing what a 5 second google search will teach you.

fandomsandfeminism:

xxtopamaxx:

Wtf?! How the hell does that work?! Dumb bitch

Did you consider googleing this to see what she was referring to? Because I wasn’t sure either, but sure enough, a quick google search found: 

Clime Change will affect women more severly than men

The report, Gender and Climate Change(available here as a PDF), concludes that women are more severely affected by climate change and natural disasters because of their social roles and because of discrimination and poverty. To make matters worse, they’re also underrepresented in decision-making about climate change, greenhouse gas emissions, and, most critically, discussions and decisions about adaptation and mitigation. From the report:

For example, the 20,000 people who died in France during the extreme heat wave in Europe in 2003 included significantly more elderly women than men. In natural disasters that have occurred in recent years, both in developing and in developed countries, it is primarily the poor who have suffered—and all over the world, the majority of the poor are women, who at all levels earn less than men. In developing countries, women living in poverty bear a disproportionate burden of climate change consequences. Because of women’s marginalized status and dependence on local natural resources, their domestic burdens are increased, including additional work to fetch water, or to collect fuel and fodder. In some areas, climate change generates resource shortages and unreliable job markets, which lead to increased male-out migration and more women left behind with additional agricultural and households duties. Poor women’s lack of access to and control over natural resources, technologies and credit mean that they have fewer resources to cope with seasonal and episodic weather and natural disasters. Consequently traditional roles are reinforced, girls’ education suffers, and women’s ability to diversify their livelihoods (and therefore their capacity to access income-generating jobs) is diminished.

The report notes examples from other sources, including this:

An Oxfam Report (March 2005) on the impact of the 2004 Asia Tsunami on women raised alarms about gender imbalances since the majority of those killed and among those least able to recover were women. In Aceh, for example, more than 75 percent of those who died were women, resulting in a male-female ratio of 3:1 among the survivors. As so many mothers died, there have been major consequences with respect to infant mortality, early marriage of girls, neglect of girls’ education, sexual assault, trafficking in women and prostitution. These woes, however, are largely neglected in the media coverage.

And this:

In a study executed on behalf of ACTIONAID in 1993-1994 in the Himalayan region of Nepal, it became clear that environmental degradation has compounded stress within households and pressure on scarce resources. This meant that the pressure on children, particularly girl children, to do more work and at an earlier age was increasing. Girls do the hardiest work, have the least say and the fewest education options. Programmes that concentrate only on sending more girls to school were failing as the environmental and social conditions of the families deteriorated.

Amazing what a 5 second google search will teach you.

(via ecumenicalseeker)